Visa Cryptocurrency

U.S. Envoy in Ethiopia in Peace Push as TPLF Retreats

U.S. Envoy in Ethiopia in Peace Push as TPLF Retreats
Written by publishing team

here today Foreign Policy Brief: US envoy heads to Ethiopia To push for peace talks, the Russian-led security bloc to send peacekeepers to Kazakhstan, Novak Djokovic’s visa problems spark Australia – Serbia tensions.

If you’d like to receive the morning feed in your inbox every day of the week, please sign up here.


The US envoy on the last visit to Ethiopia

here today Foreign Policy Brief: US envoy heads to Ethiopia To push for peace talks, the Russian-led security bloc to send peacekeepers to Kazakhstan, Novak Djokovic’s visa problems spark Australia – Serbia tensions.

If you would like to receive the Morning Brief in your inbox every day of the week, please subscribe here.


The US envoy on the last visit to Ethiopia

US envoy to the Horn of Africa Jeffrey Feltman is visiting Ethiopia for talks with senior government officials amid fresh hopes for a ceasefire in the 14-month-old conflict.

The Ethiopian government’s fortunes have changed since November, when forces of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front forced their way south, coming within 200 miles of the capital, Addis Ababa.

Since then, a government offensive has successfully pushed the TPLF forces north, from Afar and Amhara and back to their home region.

In addition to morale-boosting visits to the front by Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, the progress appears to have been another advertisement for the effectiveness of Turkey’s Bayraktar drones, as relatively cheap air support has proven effective in targeting TPLF forces.

Aid groups in Tigray have criticized the air strikes as indiscriminate, saying at least 143 people have been killed and 213 wounded since the strikes in October.

It is another example of how Turkish drones are rapidly becoming a feature in war zones in the 21st century, having helped turn the tide in the Libyan civil war and give Azerbaijan victory in its conflict with Armenia in Nagorno-Karabakh. (Ukraine’s acquisition of Bayraktar drones was cited as one of the reasons for the Russian military build-up near its borders.)

Today’s visit to Feltman is likely to be his last as envoy to the United States, after Reuters reported on Wednesday his impending resignation. David Satterfield, the outgoing US ambassador to Turkey, will replace Feltman.

Ethiopia has repeatedly rejected US calls for a ceasefire, prompting the US to increase pressure by taking the country out of the African preferential trade programme. State Department spokesman Ned Price, speaking last week, said the Ethiopian government’s decision not to go after the Tigray Liberation Front in the Tigray region was an “opportunity” for both sides to “stop conflict processes and come to the negotiating table.”


What are we following today?

Kazakhstan’s turmoil. The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), a group made up of Russia, Belarus, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, has accepted a request from Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev to deploy peacekeepers in the country as it experiences historic – and violent – unrest caused by the government’s scrapping of fuel price caps. The Kazakh government has since resigned, and Tokayev has fired powerful former leader Nursultan Nazarbayev as head of the country’s Security Council.

The Kazakh Interior Ministry reported that eight police and National Guard personnel were killed in the protests, and 317 people were injured. In Almaty, the largest city, protesters set fire to the mayor’s office and took over the airport.

US-Japan Relations. U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken and U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin met with their Japanese counterparts, Secretary of State Hayashi Yoshimasa and Secretary of Defense Kiichi Nobu, under the auspices of the U.S.-Japan Security Advisory Committee. In addition to discussions on security and the Indo-Pacific region, the US parties are likely to hear new invitations to the first White House visit of new Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

Lithuania and Taiwan are deepening relations. Taiwan plans to create a $200 million investment fund for Lithuania focused on improving the tech industry in the Baltic nation as the two countries work to improve relations after Lithuania allowed the de facto opening of a Taiwanese embassy in its capital, Vilnius. It is one of several steps Taiwan has taken to make up for Lithuania’s apparent penalty from China, in which a Taiwanese company bought 20,400 bottles of Lithuanian rum that was banned from entering China.


North Korea missile test North Korea said its missile launch on Wednesday included the test of a “hypersonic glide warhead,” the second time it has tested technology designed to beat modern missile defences. The Korean Central News Agency said it “accurately hit” its target 430 miles from the launch site.

Energy problems in Kosovo. Kosovo has become the latest country to ban cryptocurrency mining as it tries to curb energy use amid rising prices. Those measures included imposing power cuts, which led to protests where residents blamed Economy Minister Artan Rezvanoli. Kosovo joins Iran, which recently enacted a temporary ban on cryptocurrency mining to prevent power outages, and China, which banned the practice on environmental grounds.


FP . recommends

On the anniversary of a pro-Trump mob storming the Capitol, is the US any closer to a real civil conflict? From our printed version, Stephen Markey explores the extent to which the US military is prepared for an attack from within.


Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic has spoken out against the “mistreatment” of his compatriot, world-ranked men’s tennis star, Novak Djokovic, after the player’s visa was revoked upon his entry to Melbourne, where he had hoped to participate in the Australian Open. Djokovic remains in an undisclosed location awaiting appeal after a 10-hour standoff with Australian officials. He may face deportation on Monday.

Djokovic has long voiced opposition to vaccines and won medical exemption from state authorities over his vulnerability to play in the tournament, but a barrage of criticism from Australians amid accusations of double standards has prompted the government to make a radical change. “Rules are rules. Nobody is above these rules.” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.

Correction: Yesterday’s newsletter misidentified the Kazakh city of Almaty.

About the author

publishing team